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Healthy Communities

Hooping on Broad Avenue

Civic Plaza Fountain

Crosstown Block Party

Demanding healthy communities has become a battle cry in Memphis. As a city, we understand at the core of happiness, economic development and success is a population of healthy citizens. Recent years have seen a confluence of corporate, non-profit and community actions all directed at a single-goal: making Memphis healthy. And the communal work is not coindidence, because it takes everyone's involvement to create a healthy environment. True community health means access to quality healthcare, fresh foods and safe outdoor space. We are working together to design our city – our buildings, neighborhoods, communities – to make healthy living an easy choice.



Healthy Communities Features

A May 13 clean-up day at the site of a future homeless shelter for LGBTQ youth.

Nearly half of homeless youth are LGTBQ. OUTMemphis is doing something about it.

OUTMemphis could soon begin construction on an innovative shelter complex made out of shipping containers. Once completed, LGBTQ youth will be allowed to stay at the facility and receive wraparound services to help them make the next step to stability.

Almost 30 at risk youth have been employed with Sweet LaLa’s Bakery since it opened in 2014.

Video: Sweet LaLa's bakery in South Memphis gives juvenile offenders a second chance

Almost 30 at-risk youth have been employed with Sweet LaLa’s Bakery since it opened in 2014.

Barbara Nesbit hangs out with the kids at the Vance Avenue Youth Development Center.

Vance Avenue Youth Development Center is a free safety net for South Memphis children

Barbara Nesbit isn’t a childcare provider. She’s a diplomat, and she helps her kids navigate the barriers that arise from living in poverty.

Drag queens make their entrance at the National Civil Rights Museum.

Tri-State Black Pride educates and uplifts local black LGBTQ community

Memphis Black Pride has been rebranded after an over 20-year run. Tri-State Black Pride places an emphasis on education and bringing together black LGBTQ community members from the region.

Jeremy Stein, general manager for Lucky Heart Cosmetics stands with Bennie Franklin, an employee of 33 years, and Olivet Montgomery, an employee of 52 years, by the mural outside the company's new storefront on Dr. Martin Luther King Boulevard.

This black beauty company survived segregation in Memphis. Now it faces off against e-commerce.

Founded in 1935, Lucky Heart Cosmetics has seen its share of changes. The black beauty product manufacturer has opened its first retail store in the hopes of attracting its next generation of loyal customers.
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