The Pinch

The Pinch District took its name in the 1800s from a pejorative term for the emaciated Irish immigrants fleeing the potato famine (“pinch gut”). The Pinch was home to the city’s earliest Irish, Italian, Russian, and Greek immigrants, as well as Memphis’ Jewish community through the 1930s. Suburban expansion post-World War II decimated the Pinch’s population, and it has since struggled to maintain stability. There are hopes that the newly repurposed Pyramid, now a Bass Pro Shop flagship store, will anchor new growth in the area.

Development NewsVolunteers installed planters that form a dividing wall to passing traffic on National Street.
Feature StoryOn The Ground editor Cole Bradley introduces the night's speakers.
Feature StoryCourtlan Black is all smiles as David Yancey announces him the winner of the boys' aged 13 to 15 division at a skate competition held at the Greenlaw Community Center (Cole Bradley)
Feature Storyhorse

Video: The origin story of Downtown's horse-drawn carriages


Development NewsHeights Line enhancement project
Feature StoryPeople from all walks of life mingle beneath the "branches" of Treedom Memphis.
Feature StoryYoung men play basketball in Booker T. Washington park.
Feature StoryA mirrored exterior at the Rendezvous shipping facility in the Pinch District reflect historic buildings. (Ziggy Mack)
Feature StoryMadison Taper, winner of the girls' ages 8 to 15 division, shows off her new Fluxus skateboard. Fluxus boards are made in Memphis and are designed by local artists. (Shelda Edwards)
Feature StorySkateboard
Development NewsReadbox

Memphis Public Libraries use Readbox to build awareness


Feature StoryAn Uptown resident adds her priorities to a list of possible new developments. (Community Redevelopment Agency)
Feature StoryLaura Wheeler has worked at Westy's for one year. (Brandon Dahlberg)

Westy’s turns 35 as The Pinch turns a corner


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