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Leadership

Mayor A.C. Wharton

Governor Bill Haslam

County Commissioner James Harvey

A great city is driven by great leaders. In business, government and education, our community leaders are solving problems and driving innovation. By training and empowering Memphis leadership to make an impact, our city is guaranteeing a better future in all sectors. The effects of good leadership – making a difference in families, jobs, and neighborhoods – ripple.



Features

Soulsville

Mapping the decline and revival of Soulsville USA

As a coda to its On the Ground program, the High Ground News team examines the area known as Soulsville USA from its turn-of-the-century designation as a residential hub, the 1960 opening of groundbreaking Stax Records, decades of decline and recently -- revival. 

Economic Justice

It's up to us: Considering economic justice in Memphis

A diverse crowd stood up for inclusion of Memphis' minority-owned businesses at "Economic Justice in the City," a panel event hosted by High Ground News and EPIcenter Memphis at the historic Clayborn Temple. The full program can be viewed below.

Students at Humes Preparatory Academy wait for parents and community members to take their seats.

In photos: North Memphis students honor thread of royalty from African queens to kings of pop music

Energy was high in the auditorium at Humes Preparatory Academy Middle School on Friday afternoon. Students at the school, located along Manassas Street on Smokey City’s western edge, spent their February taking their lessons from Black History Month and turning it into a three-act performance.

Porter Leath Childrens’ Home on Manassas Street is the oldest structure in Klondike/Smokey City. It was an orphanage until 1969 when it became a multi-service agency to serve more children in need.

Prosperity and decline shape Klondike Smokey City's history

Klondike Smokey City’s history tells a story of prosperity but also one of decline with shuttered factories, white flight and racial segregation at its core. 

Darrell Cobbins

Op-ed: Economic justice means loving Memphis in the public eye

We have a plan for our parks and greenways, our Downtown, our workforce development, then why not a plan to address the biggest obstacle staring us in the face?  A locking of arms that says we will not be a community where this economic imbalance exists for future generations to toil over. 
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Leadership In the News

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