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Livable Communities

A building project with Habitat for Humanity

Picnic table in Overton Park

We are no more than the sum of our parts – together Memphis' individual neighborhoods create the unique culture of the Bluff City. And a smart Memphian knows our success is rooted in these communities and supports the development and revitalization of economically sustainable and vibrant neighborhoods. High Ground covers those who are keeping communities clean, safe, healthy and connected.

Features

Porter Leath Childrensí Home on Manassas Street is the oldest structure in Klondike/Smokey City. It was an orphanage until 1969 when it became a multi-service agency to serve more children in need.

Prosperity and decline shape Klondike Smokey City's history

Klondike Smokey City’s history tells a story of prosperity but also one of decline with shuttered factories, white flight and racial segregation at its core. 

Robert Church

Memphis black history: Millionaire Robert Church rebuilds Memphis after the Yellow Fever epidemic

Robert Church stuck it out. He dedicated his life to the city that he loved even when times got difficult. When he had the privilege to run away, he stayed and invested in Memphis.

Quincy Morris, the president and director of the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp., sits for a portrait at the KSCCDC office.

Is SPARCC the start of North Memphis opportunity?

Is $1 million enough to turn around the decades of disinvestment and decline that have plagued North Memphis? 

A view of Decatur Street in Smokey City.

SPARCC grant targets North Memphis for equitable development

North Memphis, which has suffered from chronic public and private disinvestment, is getting an injection of capital with a $1 million grant and access to a larger $90 million financing pool. 

Brandon Marshall painting a recent temporary mural at the Crosstown strip.

Public art investments create a moveable museum for Memphis

"Public art has become much more an expectation rather than something we can’t afford or as something unnecessary," said Carissa Hussong, executive director of the Metal Museum about Memphis' 20-year dance with public art. 
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