COVID19

Feature Story Caribe Sabor opened in 2016 at 662 Madison Avenue in The Edge. It serves traditional Venezuelan and Caribbean foods like arepas, tequeños, pastelitos, as well as unique dishes unique to Sabor Caribe. (High Ground News)

Video: Take a pandemic-safe trip to Venezuela with Sabor Caribe


Feature Story Starkisha James, 32, is a teacher at Newberry Elementary. (Shelia Williams)
Feature Story Homes in Lea's Woods (Ziggy Mack)
Feature Story Geraldine Williams, 63, sits on her porch in North Memphis. Williams is a bus driver Durham School Services who says she'll be back in the driver's seat as soon as she can. (Shelia Williams)

Back to School: A Memphis bus driver shares her struggles and fears


Feature Story Crab legs with Drop Sauce is a best-seller at Straight Drop Seafood in North Memphis. (Straight Drop Seafood)

New Straight Drop Seafood is the right thing to crave


Feature Story Christine Jones and her mother Irma (behind) walk down the hall toward an exam room while being seen at the Guthrie Primary Care Clinic in Smokey City, North Memphis. (Andrea Morales, 2017).

Healthcare has never been equitable and the pandemic is proof


Feature Story Lance Banks is a first grader at Perea Elementary School in North Memphis. (Submitted)

Kids speak on life and learning in the pandemic


Feature Story An employee of La Michoacana ice cream and paleta shop serves up a fruit cup with tajin. (Forever Ready Productions)

Video: Paletas in the pandemic with La Michoacana


Feature Story (Wikimedia Commons, Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

The pandemic is changing how Memphis does preschool


Feature Story Dalisia “Dee” Brye closed on her new home in Whitehaven in June with the help of United Housing's HUD-certified housing counselors. Brye sought home ownership after realizing that mortgage payments would be less than rental payments. (Submitted)
Feature Story Kenzie Cleaves stands inside a vacant unit in her North Memphis apartment complex that she said has been unsecured for over a year. Unsafe housing conditions can increase COVID-19-related deaths. (Ziggy Mack)

In poor communities, toxic housing is a risk factor for COVID-19 deaths


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