Hickory Hill

Hickory Hill was part of unincorporated Shelby County until 1999. Today, it's a middle and lower-income, majority-black neighborhood and home to the city's second largest Hispanic community. It was first developed as a collection of upper and middle class, majority-white subdivisions. Economic decline came as chain retailers, industry and investment dollars followed wealthier residents out of area after annexation. Crime rates are higher now and home values lower, but Hickory Hill as a whole is still middle-income compared to the city as a whole. It has important assets including active community groups, a substantial small business community, and Memphis' largest community city. 

Feature Story An employee of La Michoacana ice cream and paleta shop serves up a fruit cup with tajin. (Forever Ready Productions)

Video: Paletas in the pandemic with La Michoacana


Feature Story Husband and wife Nancy and Patricio Gonzalez carry equipment to the Gaisman Community Center at the end of game day. They are the directors and coaches of Illegal Arts Memphis soccer league. (Natalie Eddings)

In Photos: Memphis neighborhoods revisited


Feature Story The High Ground team enjoys a 'thank you lunch' on December 19 with key stakeholders who helped build our On the Ground coverage in Hickory Hill, including residents and representatives from nonprofits and the Memphis Police Department. (High Ground)

Our 'see you later' to Hickory Hill


Feature Story Neighborhood Christian Centers' newest location is in partnership with Power Center Academy in Hickory Hill. Students, their family members, and their neighbors now have closer access for food assistance and other supports. (Brandon Dill)
Feature Story The Career Advantage Youth Program helps people ages 16 to 24 identify their employment goals and potential and connects them with the tools they need to see success. (Submitted)
Feature Story Residents of Kirby Pines ride in style across the expansive Hickory Hill campus. (Kirby Pines)

Retirement is anything but relaxing at Kirby Pines Lifecare Community


Feature Story Don't be intimidated by the long lines at La Michoacana's Summer Avenue location. They move quickly and the reward is worth the wait. (Josh McLane, La Michoacana)

Ice cream shop La Michoacana is prepping for two new locations in Olive Branch, Little Rock


Feature Story World Overcomers Church has hosted previous events for single mothers in their own congregation. This year's Christmas expo event is the first event for single moms that is open to the broader community. (Terrance Davis)

Church to host Single Moms Christmas Expo in Hickory Hill


Feature Story This choreographed slap between two characters will be a powerful moment in the upcoming Black History Month skit performed by the newly formed Hickory Hill Drama Club. (AJ Dugger)
Feature Story Participants of the Memphis Youth Crime Watch at Kirby High School. (AJ Dugger)

Cops and kids come together at Kirby High


Feature Story The light of a claw machine casts an eerie light down the hallway of the former Hickory Ridge Mall. The mall is now owned by World Overcomers Church, who are working to repurpose it as a town center. (Ziggy Mack)

The History of Hickory Hill, Part II: Annexation and Aftermath


Feature Story Southern Hands Home Style Cooking offers classic soul food entrees and sides, including smothered pork chops, fried chicken, meat loaf, baked spaghetti, black-eyed peas, and cornbread. (Cole Bradley)
Feature Story Community Court Referees John Cameron mediates cases involving common code violations. Community Courts are hosted in Hickory Hill and other communities, which helps residents avoid going Downtown for Environmental Court. (Lisa Harris)
Feature Story L to R: Councilwoman Patrice Robinson, her assistant, LaKevia Perry, and Hickory Hill resident Rorey Lawrence pose for a photo at the community holiday party held at the Hickory Hill Community Center on November 7. (A.J.Dugger III)

City Councilwoman hosted holiday party for Hickory Hill


Feature Story Members of STAARS pose for a group picture. Founder Barbara Davis stands at the forward center. (STAARS)

STAARS focuses the fight against breast cancer on African Americans


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